We remain open to provide care for your pets. We are following the direction of government and regulatory authorities and have implemented hospital and visit protocols to keep both you and our team safe. For regular updates on our hours and visit protocols, please follow our social media platforms.

Ear Mites

Ear mites are a small, almost microscopic parasite belonging to the Arachnida family, like ticks and mange mites.

There are two main species, the Neotodres and the Otodectes. The neotodres mostly affect cats, while the Otodectes affects cats, dogs, rabbits, and ferrets. On a very rare occasion, they have affected humans.

Since Otodectes cynotis are the most common and can affect a wide variety of animals, we will focus on them. They are transmitted by direct contact with an infected animal. Once they are on your pet, they begin to feed on skin cells, blood and earwax. Next, they begin to lay eggs. Once laid, the eggs require four days of incubation time. Once the egg has hatched the larva feed for one week before changing into a protonymph. After the protonymph stage is deutonymph, and the life cycle gets interesting. The deutonymph, which is gender-neutral, mates with an adult male otodectes. If the deutonymph changes into a female, she lays her eggs, feeds and finds another mate. If the deutonymph changes into a male, it finds a female to mate with. This entire life cycle is completed in three weeks on a single host. A single female can lay five eggs a day. That’s 140 eggs per month! It’s a good thing they only live for 2 months.

If your pet has contracted ear mites, you will notice red, inflamed ears, they may be itchy, or irritated. You may also see dark, crusty debris, similar to coffee grounds. Due to the irritation and itchiness of the ears, you may notice lots of head shaking. It can lead to an aural hematoma if the shaking becomes excessive.

Treatment for ear mites is fairly easy if the pet is compliant. It involves regular cleaning of the ears and medications. Since ear mites are highly contagious, treatment is necessary for all animals in the house. The whole process may take up to 4 weeks to treat completely. Severe infections may take longer. Fortunately, ear mites cannot live in the environment very long, so treatment of your home is unnecessary.

If you think your pet has ear mites, please bring them in to be tested and treated. Ear mites may be small, but they can cause a lot of pain.

If you have any questions, give us a call at 604.463.7100 for more information.

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COVID-19: Additional measures we are taking

Dear Clients,

Due to the close contact that our work requires, we have taken additional measures to protect you and our team while providing care for your furry family members.

The following changes are effective as of Thursday, March 26, 2020:

1. We are currently operating a "closed waiting room" policy to protect our clients and staff. When you arrive, please remain in your vehicle and use your cell phone to call us at 604-463-7100. We will bring your pet into the hospital for an examination with the veterinarian. The veterinarian will then call you to discuss our recommended treatment plan. After your appointment, a technician will return your pet to your car and take care of any needed medications and payment.

2. We are continuing to accept appointments for urgent or sick pets, as well as time-sensitive puppy/kitten vaccinations. All other services will be scheduled for a later time. However, if you're unsure whether your pet needs medical attention, please call us to discuss your situation.

3. We are still OPEN with the following hours:
Sunday to Saturday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

4. If you are ordering food or medications, please allow 2-4 business days as our suppliers are dealing with increased demand and are trying to fill orders as quickly as possible. We will advise you as soon as your order arrives. Please call us when you arrive to pick up your order, but do not enter the hospital. Our staff will bring your order to your car. You can also use our online store and have your food delivered directly to your home. To sign up for the Online Store, please visit our website.

5. For the time being, we are not accepting cash as payment. Credit cards and debit card payments are still available.

6. Online consultations are now available! If you wish to connect with a veterinarian via message, phone or video, visit our website and follow the "Online Consultation" link.

7. Following the recommendations of our government and medical experts, we are doing our best to practice social distancing within the constraints of our jobs. We have taken these measures to avoid both contracting and facilitating the spread of this disease.

Thank you for helping us be diligent for everyone's safety. As we have heard from all levels of government, the situation is fluid, and any updates will be provided as changes occur.

- Your dedicated team at Alouette Animal Hospital